Information Architecture

Why Is Information Architecture Helpful?

Once you understand what information architecture (IA) is, you may wonder why exactly it is that you need it, in order to have a successful site. Maybe your site has some usability problems or suffers from common taxonomy mistakes, but isn’t that something that anyone can just go in and adjust with a few tweaks of the design? Technically, yes. But you’re most likely only resolving a surface level issue with a band-aid fix, as opposed to addressing the real website problems that you’re suffering from.

What Is Information Architecture?

Is your customer service team spending most of their time answering questions that are directly answered on your website? Is your bounce rate far higher than it should it be? Is the most used function of your website the search bar? All of these common website usability problems are symptoms and signs of poor information architecture. Information architecture (IA) aims to connect users with the content that they are looking for, in a seamless and intuitive manner.

How To Improve Website Search

When looking to improve the searchability on your website or intranet or in your CMS or DAM, there are a few areas where you can look to solve searchability problems. This second part in a two-part series focuses on solving searchability problems.

Website Search Sucks: A Common Website Problem

When I talk with customers about website problems, I frequently hear the refrain: "Our website search is terrible. People tell us it sucks. We need to fix it." Or "I can't find anything on the website and the search doesn't give me what I am expecting." There are a few areas where we can look to fix search problems. Normally, I start with user interviews and testing, then move on to reviewing site analytics, metadata, and taxonomy.

User Research and IA for Government

Faced with a design mandate, this government organization needed to do research before designing the solution to ensure the solution was appropriate for its audiences. We helped this organization go through interviews, analysis, journey mapping, and information architecture work.

Website Navigation by Audience: 3 Reasons Not to Use It

On the surface, audience based navigation seems to make sense. In user-centred design, we design for the user. If we group information based on the different users we've identified, then the user will know where to look on the website. In my early days, I did once try my hand at audience based navigation and quickly learned a few things (and felt an immense amount of frustration).

Improving Content Findability with Better Website Information Architecture

Maybe the website isn't well organized. Maybe users don't take the time to look through the website. Maybe users have had bad experiences in the past and can't be bothered to look on the website. Rest assured there are you can improve content findability with better website information architecture.

Information Architecture for Purdys Chocolates

Purdys contacted Key Pointe because sections of their website weren’t delivering needed results for their fundraising and group purchase programs. We reviewed these areas and provided recommendations to Purdys.

Information Architecture Review to Improve Findability

When looking to improve the findability on your website or intranet or in your CMS or DAM, there are a few areas where you can look to diagnose and solve findability problems. To find these problems, you can do an expert review and user testing. This second part in a two-part series focuses on solving findability problems.

Information Architecture Review to Diagnose Findability Problems

When looking to improve the findability on your website or intranet or in your CMS or DAM, there are a few areas where you can look to diagnose and solve findability problems. To find these problems, you can do an expert review and user testing. This first part in a two-part series focuses on diagnosing findability problems.

Using Card Sorting to Increase Content Findability

When improving a website or intranet (or any content product), you can focus on findability with an IA review and assessment and with card sorting and task testing. This article focuses on how to improve findability through card sorting.

The Basics of Taxonomy Use and Maintenance

Keeping a taxonomy up-to-date will be very useful in re-purposing content on the site, tagging content properly so you can find it again, and allowing visitors to filter the content. Learn about why and how to use a taxonomy.

Information Architecture for Rocky View County

Working with a content strategist, we took Rocky View through a user-centred design process, then created a new information architecture and content strategy. During our research, it became clear that Rocky View served a diverse and geographically dispersed community which needed geographically appropriate information.

Information Architecture Deliverable Examples

In information architecture, there are a few deliverables meant to communicate the information design to all the stakeholders. Here's a brief overview of what can be delivered on an IA project and why these things are important.